Instagram RSS

lurvemag:

VIRGINIA WOOLF: ART, LIFE AND VISION

The National Portrait Gallery

Delve into the eventful and interesting life of the English writer Virginia Woolf, considered to be one of the most important writers of the 20th century. The National Portrait Gallery is showcasing a very personal look into Woolf’s life before, at the height, and the tragic end to her career. 

Woolf had a modern approach to writing, she was inspired by avant-garde, her Bloomsbury group friends but mostly from her real life experiences. Woolf touched on important issues within her writing, such as feminism, depression and homosexuality. She had a voice and used it. Woolf was considered a significant figure in the London literacy society. She began writing in 1900 for The Times Literacy Supplement about the Brontë literacy family. Her first book The Voyage Out was published in 1915, inspired by her own personal emotions and experiences of sexuality and death. To The Lighthouse (1927) was considered by Time Magazine as one of the top 100 best English language novels. Again, the book was Woolf’s own experiences and thoughts on childhood and adult relationships.

Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision lets you see rare belongings of letters, diaries and books exposing Woolf’s thoughts, as if she is in the room with you. Black and white atmospheric photographs of Woolf taken by Man Ray and colourful characteristic portraits by Roger Fry. As well as photographs of family and friends.

Be inspired and get to know Virginia Woolf in an intimate setting. A writer who is still relevant today and should not be ignored.

“Every secret of a writer’s soul, every experience of his life, every quality of his mind is written large in his works.” - Virginia Woolf.

For more information visit http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/virginiawoolf/home.php

Listen to Patrick Wolf - To The Lighthouse, inspired by Virginia Woolf.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5zjuLulK_o 

Article by Bronwyn Stemp.

VIRGINIA WOOLF: ART, LIFE AND VISION

The National Portrait Gallery

Delve into the eventful and interesting life of the English writer Virginia Woolf, considered to be one of the most important writers of the 20th century. The National Portrait Gallery is showcasing a very personal look into Woolf’s life before, at the height, and the tragic end to her career. 

Woolf had a modern approach to writing, she was inspired by avant-garde, her Bloomsbury group friends but mostly from her real life experiences. Woolf touched on important issues within her writing, such as feminism, depression and homosexuality. She had a voice and used it. Woolf was considered a significant figure in the London literacy society. She began writing in 1900 for The Times Literacy Supplement about the Brontë literacy family. Her first book The Voyage Out was published in 1915, inspired by her own personal emotions and experiences of sexuality and death. To The Lighthouse (1927) was considered by Time Magazine as one of the top 100 best English language novels. Again, the book was Woolf’s own experiences and thoughts on childhood and adult relationships.

Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision lets you see rare belongings of letters, diaries and books exposing Woolf’s thoughts, as if she is in the room with you. Black and white atmospheric photographs of Woolf taken by Man Ray and colourful characteristic portraits by Roger Fry. As well as photographs of family and friends.

Be inspired and get to know Virginia Woolf in an intimate setting. A writer who is still relevant today and should not be ignored.

“Every secret of a writer’s soul, every experience of his life, every quality of his mind is written large in his works.” - Virginia Woolf.

For more information visit http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/virginiawoolf/home.php

Listen to Patrick Wolf - To The Lighthouse, inspired by Virginia Woolf.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5zjuLulK_o 

Article by Bronwyn Stemp.

ESCAPE TO FINE ART

THE COURTAULD GALLERY

There is a lot to gaze at, at the Courtauld Gallery, located within Somerset House when you’re ready. Inside hangs a worthy collection of paintings, drawings, prints and even sculptures from the most important artists, from the antique renaissance to the 20th century.

The Courtauld Gallery allows you to remember real art, not on the screen but up close in real life. What’s exciting is, this kind of art makes you ask questions… is Vincent Van Gogh in pain in his “Self portrait with bandaged ear”, which we would now create in a matter of seconds but call it a selfie. Other main works in The Courtauld include, “A bar at the Folies-Bergère” By Édouard Manet, a lively painting capturing the atmospheric scene of the Paris music hall. Edgar Degas’ stylish “Two dancers on the stage” couldn’t make ballet more appealing. Luckily for us, Degas had a permit that allowed him to watch rehearsals backstage at Opéra de Paris, where he captured the personality and realness of the dancers. The elegancy and concentration of the ballerinas as well as the simple details of the flowers on the dresses, is captured in an avant-garde way by Degas. He deliberately chose to not include every dancer and create an unusual cropping of the painting by using unique viewpoints. Finally, you can’t miss the unusual and mythical “The trinity with saints” by Alessandro Filipepo Botticelli. Mary Magdalen is dressed head to toe in her own hair alongside John the Baptist who is dressed in fur, a sign of wilderness which loses me into fantasy land. I wonder if this may have been an inspiration to designer Charlie Le Mindu’s collection of garments made from hair? I’m transported to a world of peace, vibrance, harmony and nature. There is a nice little hint of humour too, from the two small Archangels, who seem to be chatting to each other and taking no notice of what’s happening behind them. It’s like I just read a magical chapter in the bible that makes me want to know and read more, to complete the story. 

Plus other wonderful paintings, drawings and sculptures dating back to the 18th century. From the artists Henri Matisse, Roger Fry, Paul Gauguin, Claude Monet and Paul Cèzanne. Drawings by Dürer, Michelangelo, Rubens, Turner and sculptures by Gaugin, Edgar Degas, Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth.

The Courtauld offers a wide variety of beauty and history.

Book your tickets now at http://www.courtauld.ac.uk £3 with National Art Pass.

Visit The Courtauld Gallery blog http://galleryblog.courtauld.ac.uk for behind the scenes access.


Article by Bronwyn Stemp.

(Source: lurvemag)

I Called U (But You Weren’t There)

Pt.1

Photography by Edmund Aves

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Models Evangeline Ling, Robbie McKinnon, Jackson Hale, Kisa Cheban, Chris Arundel, Beth Donaghy, Emil Terry, Louis Baines, Karol Santos, Kyran O, Raffaella Mandriota, Laud Robin Steel.

From the latest issue of LURVE.

I called u (but you weren’t there)

Pt.2 

Photography by Edmund Aves

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Models Evangeline Ling, Robbie McKinnon, Jackson Hale, Kisa Cheban, Chris Arundel, Beth Donaghy, Emil Terry, Louis Baines, Karol Santos, Kyran O, Raffaella Mandriota, Laud Robin Steel

From the latest issue of LURVE.

BREATHELESS WITHOUT YOU

Photography by Paolo Zerbini

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Models Francesca Cisani, Julia Zimmer, Michela Biasibetti, Julia Shvets, Jenna Roberts, Elensio Makharashvili.

From the latest issue of LURVE.

COMME DES GARÇONS HOMME PLUS

Photography by Nicolo Terraneo

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Model Charlie Heaton

From the latest issue of LURVE.

"UNTITLED, FEBRUARY 2014"

Photography by Olivia Arthur

Styling by Alessandra Conti

Model Adwoa Aboah at Storm

From the latest issue of LURVE.

BOW, E32UF

Photography by Michelle Sank

Styling by Alessandra Conti

Model Moffy at Storm

From the latest issue of LURVE.

A SUBTLE TWIST

Photography by Sonia Sieff

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Model Lily McMenamy

From the latest issue of LURVE.

Fwd: Lang with Elisa Sednaoui

Photography by Laurence Ellis

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Actress Elisa Sednaoui

From the latest issue of LURVE.

WORKADAY

Photography by Nick Turpin

Styling by Moreno Galatà

Model Neelam Gill

From the latest issue of LURVE.